News and Awards

Awards


  1. 2010 DBIA National Award – Best Water Wastewater Project Greater than $25 Million
  2. 2010 Southeast DBIA – Best Project Water/Wastewater /Process in Southeast
  3. ENR 2010 Best of the Best Award
  4. 2010 Southeast DBIA – Best Overall Design Build Project in the Southeast
  5. Greater Applications and Innovations Technology Local Government Award
  6. 2010 Liberty Mutual Gold Safety Award
  7. Southeast Construction Best Of 2010 Winner
  8. 2010 ACEC/G Engineering Excellence Award - Grand Award
  9. 2010 ACEC National Recognition Award
  10. 2010 Environmental Business Journal Project Merit Award
  11. Southeast Construction – Best Civil/Public Works Project in Southeast
  12. 2009 IEC Excellence in Construction Award (Industrial Facility National Award)
  13. 2009 ACI Georgia Award of Excellence
 

In The News


November 17, 2010
Fulton County Issues a Proclamation for "Johns Creek Environmental Campus Design-Build Project Team Appreciation Day".

March 17, 2007
FULTON COUNTY HOSTS A CORNERSTONE CEREMONY FOR FUTURE
JOHNS CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL CAMPUS

July 6, 2006
ROSWELL COMMUNITY GETS CHANCE FOR FIRST LOOK AT
JOHNS CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL CAMPUS PROJECT

News Articles
July, 2010 Johns Creek Environmental Campus Opens (southeastgreen.com)
July, 2010 Johns Creek Environmental campus lean, green (NorthFulton.Com)
July, 2010 'Good Neighbor' ready for Fulton grand opening [PDF] (Atlanta Journal Constitution)
February, 2010 Fulton wastewater plant hidden in plain sight (Atlanta Business Chronicle)
September, 2008 Pushing State-Of-The-Art at Johns Creek (Southeast Construction)
December 27, 2007 Water Facility Construction Continues (Johns Creek Herald)
December 9, 2007 WASTEWATER PLANT ON SCHEDULE FOR 2009 (AJC)
August 8, 2007 Water Reclamation Facility on Schedule (Roswell Beacon)
Spring, 2007 Johns Creek Environmental Campus Cornerstone Ceremony (JOHNS CREEK LIVING MAGAZINE)
March 20, 2007 Environmental campus win-win Water reclamation center to offer education, reuse (JOHNS CREEK HERALD)
July 6, 2006 Fulton to discuss Johns Creek facility (AJC)
July 5, 2006 Information Meeting on New Wastewater Plant (ALPHARETTA NEIGHBOR)
June 01, 2006 County designs wastewater treatment plant Park-like setting planned in Roswell (ALPHARETTA AND ROSWELL REVUE & NEWS)
March 23, 2006 Fulton announces wastewater deal (AJC)
March 19, 2006 Sewage treatment plant finally has a contractor (AJC)

 

 

FULTON COUNTY HOSTS A CORNERSTONE CEREMONY EVENT FOR FUTURE JOHNS CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL CAMP

Community-friendly plant to provide water reclamation and environmental education

Atlanta, GA – (March 15, 2007) – Fulton County Commissioners, community leaders, County staff, area residents, and elementary school students united today to celebrate a new era in water reclamation. The Johns Creek Environmental Campus held a special Cornerstone Ceremony at 10 a.m. this morning to highlight the start of the project.

Fulton County Commission Chairman John H. Eaves and District 3 Commissioner Lynne Riley noted the importance of the facility to North Fulton and the Chattahoochee River. Additionally, Roswell Mayor Jere Wood and Johns Creek Mayor Mike Bodker commented on how the Environmental Campus will benefit their communities. Three students from nearby River Eves Elementary School provided one of the high points of the ceremony with their essays on ways to improve the local environment, specifically the Chattahoochee River, over the next 50 years.

Several attendees helped cap off the event by filling a time capsule with many items from “today” including: a T-shirt signed by the elementary school class, a City of Roswell annual report, special seed cards commemorating the event, a daily newspaper, and much more. The time capsule will eventually be embedded into one of the Campus’ structures.

“This is such an exciting day for us,” said Angela Parker, Director of Fulton County Public Works. “The Johns Creek Environmental Campus has been years in the making and would not have happened without many of the people who are here today.  The County Commission and Mayor Wood have been very supportive and County staff has worked tirelessly with EPD and other agencies to get us to where we are today. It’s also important to mention late County Commissioner Bob Fulton. He truly cared about the community and the environment. He spent countless hours working with area leaders and residents and was really the catalyst for this facility.”

Crews broke ground on the Environmental Campus in October 2006. It is expected to go into service in the fall of 2009 with a treatment capacity of 15 million gallons per day (mgd). This will make it the largest membrane biological reactor (MBR) facility in the country.

MBR is an innovative technology that removes nearly all bacteria during treatment. The membranes look similar to a car’s air filter but are much larger. MBR facilities provide a two-fold benefit: the effluent (reclaimed, clean water) is treated to a higher level than the standard reclamation process, and the facility has much smaller footprint since MBR eliminates some of the processes used during treatment. At JCEC, all the processes will be covered and enclosed. Plus the noise and odor reduction features of the facility exceed measures at all other treatment facilities in the state.

Community Benefits and Considerations
JCEC will ultimately contribute to the quality of life for current and future residents in numerous ways. It will ensure water reclamation capacity for new homes and businesses and make better use of ratepayers’ money. Because JCEC will use newer technology, it will operate more efficiently than the existing Johns Creek Water Reclamation Facility (WRF), which is nearing the end of its useful life and will be decommissioned when the new facility goes online. The treatment process will also offer a learning opportunity on water quality issues for young and old alike through the educational center. Since there is a higher level of treatment, JCEC also provides the future availability of reuse water for irrigation

The County has also put a lot of effort into working with the community to create an aesthetically pleasing site that blends with the area. The “old mill” theme for the facility was selected as the result of several pre-design sessions involving local leaders and residents. Many of the buildings’ architectural features, such as red brick, window detailings, and fieldstone accents, are reminiscent of the historic mills in Roswell and Fulton. Staff continues to respond to the site’s closest neighbors. In addition to a community meeting held last summer, several meetings have been held with homeowners next to the site. 

Environmental Benefits
JCEC’s benefits extend to the environment as well. The facility will have a greater capacity than the existing Johns Creek WRF (15 mgd vs. 7.5 mgd), but it will provide a higher level of treatment, so that the water being returned to the Chattahoochee River will be of a better quality. This also helps maintain the delicate ecological balance of the river and its aquatic life.



ROSWELL COMMUNITY GETS CHANCE FOR FIRST LOOK AT JOHNS CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL CAMPUS PROJECT JUNE 13
Focus on improving wastewater service within the Johns Creek Watershed area

Atlanta, GA – (June 29, 2006) – Roswell residents will get their first peak at plans for the Johns Creek Environmental Campus Project, a new, technologically advanced wastewater treatment facility. Attendees will also have the chance to talk one-on-one with the project team.

The Fulton County Department of Public Works plans will host a public meeting on Thursday, July 13, 2006. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. in the Community Room of the East Roswell Recreation Center, 9000 Fouts Road, Roswell.

In addition to providing details on the new facility, the meeting will also look at the broader picture of improving wastewater service within the Johns Creek watershed area as well as how the environmental campus fits this goal. Several information stations will be featured at the meeting to help residents get a better idea of how the facility will affect the area both during and after construction. Public Works will seek input for the County’s Environmental Information Document (EID) as well. The EID serves as the major planning document covering the proposed wastewater system. Comments made will be evaluated and incorporated into the document.

Below are some of the basics about the new facility:

 

Additional information about the Johns Creek Environmental Campus project is available on the Public Works page of the County’s website http://ww2.co.fulton.ga.us/county/dpw/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
under Current Projects and Reports.

Residents who are unable to attend the meeting can send their comments by mail or email to Rod Pope, P.E., Brown and Caldwell, 990 Hammond Drive, Suite 400, Atlanta, GA 30328, rpope@brwncald.com. Comments will be accepted until July 11, 2006.

Copies of the EID are also available for viewing at the following locations:

For more information, contact Kun Suwanarpa in the Department of Public Works at
(404) 730-7394.

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Southeast Construction
Pushing State-Of-The-Art at Johns Creek
$137 Million Johns Creek Environmental Campus Could Be National Model
Steve Setzer
September, 2008

The Johns Creek Environmental Campus in Roswell, Ga., won’t look or smell like a typical large-scale wastewater treatment plant. And if everything goes as planned, motorists passing by will think it’s some kind of college campus with a lake, brick-clad buildings and lush landscapes.

A design-build team led by Archer Western Contractors of Atlanta has passed the 50% completion mark on its $137 million, 15 MGD project in Fulton County. The facility will feature the largest application in the United States of a new breed of biomembrane reactor wastewater treatment plants – a technology that is becoming the standard for new and retrofitted treatment plants due to its efficiency and low cost relative to other treatment options.

The plant also will feature an above-ground environmental campus in a park-like setting designed to educate people on water and environmental issues.

If the remainder of the work goes as planned, the Johns Creek Environmental Campus, scheduled to go online in November 2009, will be a national example of how to successfully procure and deliver a major treatment plant in a crowded suburban environment.

Focused on the RFP

The Fulton County Department of Public Works’ RFP for the project included detailed performance specs, as well as extensive provisions for community relations to calm concerns from nearby neighborhoods.

http://southeast.construction.com/rpimages/_.gif

“The owners had a clear picture of what they wanted,” says Matt McCormack, project manager for Archer Western. The contractor teamed with design engineering firm Brown and Caldwell of Roswell.

The Archer Western team’s proposal was $20 million higher than the next bidder but prevailed based on overall responsiveness to the RFP, construction and design innovations and its planned approach to meeting the plant’s performance specifications, McCormack says.

Paul Williams, a procurement specialist with Fulton County, confirmed McCormack’s assertions, and said the RFP was a hybrid design/build approach.

“We defined certain base elements like noise abatement, odor control and architectural features,” as well as specification of the bioreactor membrane technology, he adds. Fulton County particularly liked Archer Western’s approach to phasing the work, as well as its design for the interpretive and educational components of the facility, Williams says.

Archer Western is self-performing roughly 70% of the work, with other large subcontracts consisting of an electrical contract with Excel Electrical of Atlanta and a $4.5 million landscaping contract with Valley Crest, also of Atlanta.

Community outreach was a key factor in the preconstruction phase and early stages of the work, says Simeone Solomero, construction manager for Fulton County. Brown and Caldwell built a detailed public Web site and provided monthly updates, along with postings from local media.

A series of public meetings were held, including several meetings early on with homeowners at a nearby neighborhood of multimillion dollar homes.

BMR Technology

General Electric’s ZeeWeed biomembrane reactor technology that’s being used on the Johns Creek project has been specified on plants totaling almost 100 MGD in north Georgia, according to GE spokesperson Anthony Kobilnyk.

The technology uses extremely fine fibers enclosed in membranes to filter the last stages of wastewater. Each membrane fiber has billions of microscopic pores that form a physical barrier to suspended solids and colloidal material in wastewater. A slight vacuum is used to create suction within the fiber that draws clean water to the inside, while blocking contaminants on the outside.

Bacteria, viruses and other pathogens are also prevented from passing through the membranes, according to GE. The result is near-drinking quality water that can be used for irrigation, groundwater recharge or process water, thus reducing demand for pure drinking water.

The membranes are housed in large cassettes that can easily be maintained and replaced as needed.

Other than Johns Creek, the most recent application in north Georgia was announced this spring for Gwinnett County, also located in suburban Atlanta. As part of a $250 million plant upgrade, the BMR technology will boost treatment capacity at Gwinnett’s Yellow River Water Reclamation Facility by 7.5 MGD to 22 MGD.

Construction Challenges

The project has not been without problems. The team struck water almost immediately after starting excavation of the deepest section of the headworks – 60 ft below grade for the main influent pumping system.

“It was almost like an old riverbed running through the excavation area,” McCormack says. The problem was contained using well points and pumps and did not seriously disrupt the schedule.

The next step involved large-scale excavation of the remainder of the below-grade process structures. Archer Western moved 200,000 cu yds of dirt, but planned the work so that the site was balanced and no excavation soil had to be removed from the site.

Archer Western chose to use precast structural elements instead of cast in place for the 90,000 sq ft of aboveground outbuildings – one of the elements cited by Fulton County as a schedule accelerator. This helped avoid production problems onsite and also allowed for staged delivery of structural shapes, McCormack says. While there have been some capacity issues with the precast subcontractor, ZMZ Precast of Atlanta, the overall schedule is still on target.

Managing Cost Escalation

The team also faced a sharp escalation in materials costs from the time the RFP was submitted in 2004 to the time construction began. Since then, costs for concrete, rebar and other basic materials have jumped significantly.

Looking back on the interval between submitting its bid and the current cost climate, “You couldn’t pick a worse time” in terms of price escalation, McCormack says. While the contract included escalation clauses, these were outstripped by the rise in materials costs, he adds.

The team worked with Fulton County to value engineer aspects of the project and nibbled away at the deficit, he says.

Fulton County’s Williams says that the initial bid of $137.6 million still stands and that any adjustments made by Archer Western have not compromised the quality of the project.

With the architectural work on the administrative buildings under way, the next major steps for the project include finishing the building interiors, installing the ZeeWeed BMR process equipment and the landscaping work. Construction completion is scheduled for July. After a four-month acceptance testing process, the plant is scheduled to go online in November 2009.

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Johns Creek Herald
Water Facility Construction Continues

Caron Cooper
December 27, 2007

Former Fulton County Commissioner Bob Fulton's vision continues as North Fulton watches the construction of the Johns Creek Environmental Campus (JCEC), the county's newest water reclamation facility using membrane technology.

Based on the success of a similar system being used in the Cauley Creek reclamation facility in Shakerag, Fulton County decided to move forward with the new Johns Creek facility. Upgrades to the current treatment plant in the Horseshoe Bend subdivision were impractical due to space limitations and high cost to bring it to regulatory standards, according to Fulton County.

The JCEC will use a membrane biological reactor system (MBR) that essentially separates the liquid and the solids. The membrane will filter out more bacteria than the existing Johns Creek reclamation facility, treating water to reuse standards for purposes other than drinking, such as irrigation.

The 90,000-square-foot facility is being constructed on 43 acres and will treat 15 million gallons of water per day, double the capacity of the current reclamation system.

The increased output will also the meet all the needs of area residents and businesses in the Johns Creek basin, which studies say will continue to grow to build-out.

The JCEC will also be an educational center for the community. Local schools will have an interactive learning campus in their own backyard.

And although not the most welcomed, the dry days have helped the construction progress at the JCEC site.

At the end of September, the contractor put the site's safety plan to the test, and Roswell's Fire Department practiced an emergency rescue drill.

Wall formation was the focus of many of the construction activities at the site in October, such as the interior walls of the biological basins and the exterior walls of the membrane gallery.

Toward the end of that month, piping and electrical conduit were run through the biological basins in preparation for the next to last slab pour.

Many of the processes under construction now will be below ground when the facility is finished.

For the last three weeks, crews began clearing the outfall pipeline easement from the tree line of the JCEC to the Chattahoochee River. The pipeline will eventually be installed within the easement and will carry the reclaimed water, or effluent, back to the Chattahoochee River.

Initial surveying work has been completed along the Chattahoochee River for two pipelines connecting JCEC to the county's collection system. Construction on the pipelines is not expected to begin until the spring of 2009 and should last about four to six months.

The Johns Creek Environmental Campus is at 8100 Holcomb Bridge Road in Roswell. For construction updates, visit www.fultonec.com.



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Atlanta Journal Constitution
WASTEWATER PLANT ON SCHEDULE FOR 2009: Building for growth in Roswell
Community-friendly plant to provide water reclamation and environmental education

Andrew B. Adler
December 9, 2007

Construction of the Johns Creek Environmental Campus is on schedule.

That was the word given by Paul V. Williams of the Fulton County Public Works Department just over a year after construction began on the wastewater treatment plant and environmental campus being built on Roswell's eastern border.

"At this point, 27 percent has been completed," Williams said. "And we are on target for the plant to begin operations in fall 2009."

The new site is rising on 43 acres along Holcomb Bridge Road on the western bank of the Chattahoochee River near Garrard's Landing.

Construction of the two pipelines that will connect the treatment plant to the county's collection system is expected to begin in spring 2009 and last four to six months.

So far, Williams said, crews from Arch Western, the project's general contractor, and its subcontractor, Ronny D. Jones Enterprises, have conducted an assessment of a proposed pipeline easement along the Chattahoochee River. Soil samples were taken and data collected in order to learn more about the conditions that exist beneath the surface prior to installing two pipelines.

The new plant, which will treat wastewater for much of north Fulton, will be permitted to process up to 15 million gallons per day and will have a new discharge point into the Chattahoochee River.

Although the $137 million project initially met with strong opposition from the city of Roswell and surrounding neighborhoods, Williams noted that concerns and complaints have dwindled down "to just a handful."

The city and county worked with the surrounding neighborhoods to answer concerns about the design before the project was put out to bid.

When the new plant opens, the existing plant located in Horseshoe Bend will be decommissioned. Only the pump station will remain. Much of the land on which the current plant resides then will be turned into green space, according to county officials.

UPDATE

THE STORY SO FAR

> Previously: Fulton County began work in late 2006 on the Johns Creek Environmental Campus, a wastewater treatment plant and environmental facility currently being built on Roswell's eastern border, along the Chattahoochee River. It will replace an older plant located at Horseshoe Bend.

> The latest: Work recently took place that involved the taking of soil samples and collecting data in order to learn more about the conditions that exist beneath the surface prior to installing two pipelines.

> What's next: Workers will continue installation of forms and concrete placement for walls and slabs for the biological reactor and other parts of the plant. The plant is set to open in 2009.

LEARN MORE

>The project has a Web site and a 24-hour hotline: 678-461-7376 or www.fultonec.com.



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Johns Creek Living Magazine
Johns Creek Environmental Campus Cornerstone Ceremony
Vicki Wilkes - Editor
Spring, 2007

The Ground Breaking Ceremony for the Johns Creek Environmental Campus on March 15th celebrated the construction start of this state of the art water treatment facility scheduled to open in 2010 that will serve all of Johns Creek and part of Roswell.
The facility is located on 43 acres off Holcomb Bridge Road between Spaulding and Barnwell and will treat 15 million gallons of water per day, doubling the current reclamation system. Using a membrane biological reactor system, the JCEC will filter out more bacteria than the existing facility, enabling the treated water to be used for irrigation. The facility will also serve as an education center for the community, with a great emphasis on enhancing the water quality of the nearby Chattahoochee River.
The mayors of Roswell and Johns Creek, and Fulton County Commissioners all briefly spoke of the tremendous benefit this will be to the County. Mayor Bodker and Commissioner Riley warmly remembered the late Fulton County Commissioner Bob Fulton who they said had been instrumental in beginning the study for this facility. “As the Johns Creek basin continues to build out, the need for this facility is more important than ever. I appreciate the foresight of the late Fulton County Commissioner Bob Fulton, who began this process many years ago. We’re happy to see it take a big step forward today.” Mayor Bodker said.
The most delightful part of the ceremony was presented by three 5th grade students from Ms. Vose’s Class at River Eves Elementary. An essay contest was held and three children were chosen with the best essays to participate in this ceremony and read their essays. The essays were amazingly descriptive of the environmental challenges we face today, and especially from such young people. A few had to stand on tip toes to reach the microphone. These exceptional children are Ty Douglas, Abby Troughton and Dorothy Cannella.
At the end of the ceremony, a time capsule was filled with items chosen by selected participants to be buried in the ‘cornerstone’ site of the facility, not to be opened for fifty years. Mayor Bodker placed a photo album depicting the incorporation of the City of Johns Creek into the capsule. The essay winners from River Eves Elementary also placed an item in the capsule.
Link to original story with photos

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Johns Creek Herald
Environmental campus win-win Water reclamation center to offer education, reuse
Caron Cooper - Staff
Tuesday, March 20, 2007


gNorth Fulton took a step toward clean water independence and cleaning up the Chattahoochee River last week.
The Johns Creek Environmental Campus (JCEC), soon to be Fulton County's newest water reclamation facility, held a cornerstone ceremony to celebrate the start of construction.
And to further cement the date in history, Fulton County commissioners, staff and River Eves elementary students filled a time capsule to be opened in 50 years.
The JCEC is the result of former Fulton County Commissioner Bob Fulton's vision and the continued efforts of the Fulton County commission and staff, the city of Roswell and surrounding neighborhoods.
"[Commissioner Bob Fulton] was very instrumental in the Cauley Creek Water Reclamation facility in Johns Creek. It is the use of the new membrane technology, which allows us to get reuse water, and he was a stalwart champion of it. He was the one who convinced the Board of Commission that it was the technology to proceed with," said Commissioner Lynne Riley.
Fulton championed for the membrane technology once again when it became apparent the current Johns Creek wastewater treatment system desperately needed expansion.
Based on the success of a similar system being used in the Cauley Creek reclamation facility in Shakerag, Fulton County decided to move forward with the new Johns Creek facility. Upgrades to the current treatment plant, in the Horseshoe Bend subdivision, were impractical due to space limitations and high cost to bring it to regulatory standards.
"I was familiar with the technology, having been there for the opening of Cauley Creek, and recognize that this is really state-of-the-art stuff. It's good for the environment and good for the community," said Roswell Mayor Jere Wood.
Water quality in the Chattahoochee River was a major concern as well. What makes the new technology so attractive is that the water it puts back in the river is cleaner than when it took it out.
The JCEC will use a membrane biological reactor system (MBR) that essentially separates the liquid and the solids. The membrane will filter out more bacteria than the existing Johns Creek reclamation facility, treating water to reuse standards for purposes other than drinking such as irrigation.
The 90,000-square-foot facility will be on 43 acres and will treat 15 million gallons of water per day, double the capacity of the current reclamation system.
The increased output will also the meet all the needs of area residents and businesses in the Johns Creek basin, which studies say will continue to grow to buildout.
Johns Creek Mayor Mike Bodker said he is excited to work with Roswell on regional issues, including water management.
The system will be enclosed to limit the typical odors associated with wastewater treatment, and the emitted gasses will be treated before being released into the atmosphere.
Roswell staff and project engineers and designers, with input from neighboring subdivisions, worked together on the architecture so that the campus will blend in with the community.
"I was afraid this would be developed intensely as a retail complex or something that wouldn't have been as attractive as this," said Wood.
Landscaping was also taken into consideration. Trees and berms, raised areas of ground covered with vegetation, will be planted and installed around the campus to create a more pleasant view from surrounding neighborhoods.
The JCEC will also be an educational center for the community. Local schools will have an interactive learning campus in their own backyard.
"The environmental campus is going to be a great place for our young children to learn, as well as adults - quite honestly I am looking forward to it myself," said Bodker.
The project, which is expected to take 40 months to complete, began in October 2006 with the excavation of the construction site.
It wasn't long before Archer Western Contractors discovered rock, and so the blasting began.
Excavation work continued through February of this year. Most recently, concrete slabs were poured and walls have started going up.
The time capsule will be embedded into one of the structures on the campus. Numerous sign-of-the-times items were placed in the capsule, like:

. A Roswell annual report and a license plate supporting local high school athletics from Roswell Mayor Jere Wood
. A cell phone and a CD from Fulton County Commissioner Lynne Riley
. A scrapbook recording the incorporation of Johns Creek from Mayor Mike Bodker

The Johns Creek Environmental Campus is at 8100 Holcomb Bridge Road in Roswell.

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Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Fulton to discuss Johns Creek facility
Jennifer Scholten - Staff
Thursday, July 6, 2006


Area residents will get their first peek at the Johns Creek Environmental Project, the new high-tech wastewater treatment facility.
The Fulton Public Works Department will host a public meeting at 7 p.m. July 13 in the community room of the East Roswell Recreation Center, 9000 Fouts Road.
Attendees will also have the chance to talk one-on-one with project officials. Several information stations will be featured to help residents get a better idea of how the facility will affect the area during and after construction.
Some of the basics about the new facility:
> Located on nearly 43 acres on Holcomb Bridge Road in Roswell, adjacent to the Chattahoochee River near Garrard's Landing;
> Construction expected to begin in late 2006 and last 40 months;
> Will be permitted by the state for 15 million gallons per day with a new outfall to the Chattahoochee River.
Residents unable to attend the meeting can send their comments by mail or e-mail to Rod Pope, Brown and Caldwell, 990 Hammond Drive, Suite 400, Atlanta, GA 30328 or to rpope@brwncald.com.
Comments will be accepted until July 11, 2006.


404-730-7394. www.co.fulton.ga.us.

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ALPHARETTA NEIGHBOR
Information Meeting on New Wastewater Plant
July 5, 2006

Plans for the Johns Creek Environmental Campus project will be on public view for the first time Thursday, July 13 at 7 p.m. at the East Roswell Recreation Center, 9000 Fouts Rd., Roswell.

The new, technologically advanced wastewater treatment facility will be located on 43 acres on Holcomb Bridge Rd. adjacent to the Chattahoochee River near Garrard’s Landing. The plant will treat up to 15 million gallons per day with a new outfall to the river.  Construction is expected to start later this year and last 40 months.

In addition to providing details on the new facility, the meeting will look at the broader picture of improving wastewater service within the Johns Creek watershed area. Information stations will be set up to help residents get an idea of how the facility will affect the area both during and after construction.

Information: ww2.co.fulton.ga.us/county/dpw/index.

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ALPHARETTA AND ROSWELL REVUE & NEWS
County designs wastewater treatment plant
Park-like setting planned in Roswell

by Bob Pepalis
June 01, 2006

gA wastewater treatment plant that will be built in Roswell next to Ellard subdivision and Garrard Landing Park will clean the water so well you could almost drink it. While that is not allowed by state health officials, Fulton County does plan to work out a way to reuse the water for irrigation at golf courses, parks and other locations.
Representatives from Fulton County's Public Works department, the design firm and the contractor gave members of the Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce an update on the Johns Creek Environmental Campus Thursday, June 1. The chamber invited them to speak at its monthly Quality Growth 2020 meeting.

"Not only can this facility accommodate the growth of North Fulton, it will also help clean and maintain the water quality in the Chattahoochee River," said Kun Suwanarpa, assistant director of Water Services for the county.

Brown and Caldwell's Rod Pope, Kun Suwanarpa of the Fulton County Public Works Department and Roswell Mayor Jere Wood discuss the Johns Creek Environmental Campus that will be built in Roswell. Wood wants to call the facility the Fulton Environmental Campus in honor of the late Bob Fulton, who championed the plant as a county commissioner.

  The county is finalizing its contract with Archer Western to build the plant, she said. Once the contract is completed, it will take 40 months to build it. Six months of that time has been set aside just for permitting.

The new plant is needed to meet the needs of the North Fulton consumers. The existing plant is within the 1,200-home Horseshoe Bend community. It was built in 1981 and is permitted to treat up to 7.5 million gallons of wastewater daily.

"Right now it has reached the end of its useful life," said Rod Pope, chief engineer for Brown and Caldwell, the design firm for the new plant. The Horseshoe Bend site does not have enough space for expansion, nor would it be cost effective because it uses old technology to treat the wastewater.

The new plant has been permitted to treat up to 15 million gallons per day.

Despite more wastewater being treated, the new plant will put less pollutants in the Chattahoochee River than the old plant, Suwanarpa said. State-of-the art technology will be used at the plant.

"We're doubling the flow for the Johns Creek Environmental Campus but the pollutant flow is considerably less," Pope said.

The plant has been in the planning stages since 2002 with the late Bob Fulton leading the way from his county commission seat. It also will include an environmental learning center. The county plans to make it an educational resource for school children and the community.

To lessen the impact building traffic will have on the community, most of the excavated dirt on the site will be used to build the contours of the land, said Jim Goyer of Archer Western. Only 10 acres of the property will be for the treatment plant.

"Roswell has a 20-acre park adjacent to this at Garrard Landing. I'd like to work with Fulton on making this a passive park," said Roswell Mayor Jere Wood.

The city's 20 acre park could be combined with the remaining acreage on the treatment plant site, Wood said, much like the county and city do at Riverside Park.

Roswell also wants to work with the county to have a traffic light installed on Holcomb Bridge there. A city fire station is just across the street from the plant site, which will share an access road with Garrard Landing Park.

Horseshoe Bend resident Lynn McIntyre, who also works with the Chattahoochee Nature Center, said the environmental campus is very important to local residents. Community members are being polled to decide what they'd like to see done with the old plant site in the middle of their subdivision, but she said a passive park would get a good reception.

A proposal to expand the Big Creek treatment plant in phases from 24 million gallons up to 31 million gallons per day in as soon as three years, and later up to 38 million gallons daily.

"I will tell you water is a critical issue," said chamber president Brandon Beach, who heard about it in a visit with Wood to the state capitol May 31.

 

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Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Fulton announces wastewater deal
Published on: 03/23/06


Fulton County Commissioners awarded Archer Western Contractors Inc. the contract for the design and construction of the Johns Creek Environmental Campus.
The facility will treat wastewater from Johns Creek Drainage Basin to irrigation standards. The facility, which will be on 43 acres of land on Holcomb Bridge Road in Roswell, will consist of a parklike campus with architectural features compatible with the surrounding community.
Plans include an education component focusing on water reclamation for reuse, water conservation, water quality and aquatic life in the Chattahoochee River.


Design and construction is expected to take 40 months and cost $137,656,741, paid from the Water and Sewerage Revenue Bonds Fund. For information, call Kun Suwanarpa at 404-730-7394.

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Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Sewage treatment plant finally has a contractor

By PAUL KAPLAN
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 03/19/06


Three years after it announced plans to build a sewage treatment plant at Roswell's eastern border, the Fulton County Commission awarded a construction contract for the job this past week.
Three years ago, it was projected to cost $95 million with 2006 as a completion date. Now it's a $137 million project — one of the most expensive the county has ever undertaken — with completion expected in 2009.
The vote Wednesday night was 6-1, with Commissioner Rob Pitts opposed. Pitts felt the job should have gone to one of two bidders who came in about $20 million below the winning bid.
But the board instead selected Archer Western, as recommended by the county staff. Its bid covered every requirement the county listed for the job. The lower bidders proposed changes that made the job cheaper — changes the staff viewed as dilutions in quality.
The project raised an uproar in Roswell when it was first announced because the site is on the Chattahoochee River at the city's eastern gateway from Gwinnett County. It abuts a lovely 22-acre wooded area Roswell bought for a passive park and the ritzy Ellard neighborhood, where homes range from $760,000 to $4 million.
The county can build the plant through its power of eminent domain, but it tried to appease Roswell and its residents by promising a state-of-the-art facility that's clean, quiet, odor-free and camouflaged to look like anything but a sewer plant.
The plant site, on the southern side of Holcomb Bridge Road, is 43 acres, but the county plans to build the facility on just 10 acres. The rest would be used for buffer and berms that enhance the campus and shelter Ellard from the plant.
The plant, known as the Johns Creek Environmental Campus, will improve sewage into nearly drinking-quality water. It also will have an educational component as an environmental center for area schools.
The plant will replace one at nearby Horseshoe Bend and will produce twice the amount of recycled water — up to 15 million gallons a day — with one-eighth the amount of pollutants reaching the river.
The deal to locate the plant at the site selected was brokered by the late Fulton County Commissioner Bob Fulton, who pointed out that if the tri-state water wars among Georgia, Florida and Alabama result in a freeze on Chattahoochee River outflows, as some fear, the Johns Creek basin of north Fulton would be fully prepared — thanks to the new plant.
Staff writer D.L. Bennett contributed to this article.

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